William Raveis Real Estate and Home Services



Posted by Deborah Schilling on 1/18/2018

Pizza is, objectively, the greatest food ever invented. It's portable, filling, easy to make in large portions, and (arguably) has some nutritional value as well. The patron saint of children's parties and companion to college students everywhere, pizza is beloved at all times of day. You can eat it hot, cold or--in the case of microwave pizza--as molten lava applied directly to the tongue. Perhaps the greatest part about pizza is the variety and ingenuity that have been applied to it over the years. There are twelve main styles of pizza in the United States, according to the pizza Wiki, and there's a lot of overlap within those styles. Today, we're going to teach you how to make three main types of pizza: New York, Chicago, and Neapolitan. Between these three, there's enough variety to ensure you'll never get sick of eating pizza pies (as if that were even remotely possible).

New York Style

People don't sit down in New York. They're either too busy or too afraid of the benches and seats on the subway. It's much safer to just stay standing. But even those who don't sit still have to eat from time to time. New York style pizza is designed for just a person. They come in huge slices that are thin enough to be folded in half and eaten like a sandwich; one hand holding your slice, the other hailing a cab or waving obscenities at the tourists. Now for making the pizza: Stretch the dough thin and circular, with the outside of the circle just a bit thicker to form your crust. Go light on the sauce. Ideally, just crush some tomatoes and season. For the cheese, go with a medium moisture mozzarella and sprinkle on some oregano and parmesan. Bake at 500ºF for around 9 minutes until your crust is golden brown and crispy.

Chicago Style Deep Dish

Where other pizza makers hide the sauce inside the pizza, Chicagoans put it right on top showing off the quality of the deep red tomatoes. This isn't a pizza to eat on the run. In fact, proper etiquette says you eat this one sitting down with a fork and knife. Here's how it's made: First you need to butter your crust. Sounds weird, but that's what makes it so flaky and delicious. Once both sides are buttered, load it into the deep dish. Then put a liberal layer of your cheese down, then pile the sauce on top of that. This one needs a bit of time in the oven to cook. 25 minutes at 425ºF and it should start to look done.

Neapolitan Style

The closest we have to the original flatbreads that came out of Naples is the neapolitan pizza. You can make it Marinara style (no cheese) or Margherita style (light cheese). To make these babies, you're going to want a nice thin crust (Remember, these were originally just baked, crisp flatbreads). Instead of sauce, this one will have olive oil and tomato chunks or no tomatoes at all. The highlight here are all the herbs and spices you can add; basil, oregano and garlic all tossed in extra virgin olive oil are what give it it's signature flavor.  




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Deborah Schilling on 1/17/2018


23 Kalmia Way , Barnstable, MA 02632

Centerville

Single-Family

$599,900
Price

6
Total Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Walk to village and bike to beach from this Bayside built contemporary Cape on quiet cul de sac. A dramatic floor to ceiling window array and open floor plan in great room (DR+LR) bring the outside in year round. Eat in kitchen with banquette window seat-looks to yard where morning sun greets you over your coffee and croissant! Braz.Cherry flooring strikes a stunning chord in main living areas on first floor. Whimsical rose hued walls in kitchen, rich green accent wall in fireplaced Family room strikes contrast with crisp custom builtins for the avid reader or collector of fine treasures. Plantation shutters in many rooms are functional but lend a gracious style to windows. 1st floor MBR suite with walkin closet. Upstair 2 BR, bonus space to finish.Preview 24/7 with walkthru video w/photos
Open House
Saturday
January 20 at 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM
In village location. Walk to Country Store , library, and playground. Bike to Craigville Beach!
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 23 Kalmia Way , Barnstable, MA 02632    Get Directions

Similar Properties





Categories: Open House  


Posted by Deborah Schilling on 1/12/2018


23 Kalmia Way , Barnstable, MA 02632

Centerville

Single-Family

$599,900
Price

6
Total Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Walk to village and bike to beach from this Bayside built contemporary Cape on quiet cul de sac. A dramatic floor to ceiling window array and open floor plan in great room (DR+LR) bring the outside in year round. Eat in kitchen with banquette window seat-looks to yard where morning sun greets you over your coffee and croissant! Braz.Cherry flooring strikes a stunning chord in main living areas on first floor. Whimsical rose hued walls in kitchen, rich green accent wall in fireplaced Family room strikes contrast with crisp custom builtins for the avid reader or collector of fine treasures. Plantation shutters in many rooms are functional but lend a gracious style to windows. 1st floor MBR suite with walkin closet. Upstair 2 BR, bonus space to finish.Preview 24/7 with walkthru video w/photos
Open House
Sunday
January 14 at 1:00 PM to 3:00 PM
In village setting-walk to village, bike to beach!
Cannot make the Open Houses?
Location: 23 Kalmia Way , Barnstable, MA 02632    Get Directions

Similar Properties





Categories: Open House  


Posted by Deborah Schilling on 1/11/2018


23 Kalmia Way , Barnstable, MA 02632

Centerville

Single-Family

$599,900
Price

6
Total Rooms
3
Beds
2/1
Full/Half Baths
Walk to village and bike to beach from this Bayside built contemporary Cape on quiet cul de sac. A dramatic floor to ceiling window array and open floor plan in great room (DR+LR) bring the outside in year round. Eat in kitchen with banquette window seat-looks to yard where morning sun greets you over your coffee and croissant! Braz.Cherry flooring strikes a stunning chord in main living areas on first floor. Whimsical rose hued walls in kitchen, rich green accent wall in fireplaced Family room strikes contrast with crisp custom builtins for the avid reader or collector of fine treasures. Plantation shutters in many rooms are functional but lend a gracious style to windows. 1st floor MBR suite with walkin closet. Upstair 2 BR, bonus space to finish.Preview 24/7 with walkthru video w/photos
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

Similar Properties





Categories: Price Change  


Posted by Deborah Schilling on 1/11/2018

 

We’re not taught much about homeownership when we’re young. Like paying bills and taxes, it’s something we’re all expected to pick up along the way. But with something as important and expensive as buying a home, there should be a guide to help first time homeowners determine if they’re ready to enter the real estate market.

Today, we’re going to attempt to provide you with that guide. We’ll offer some of the prerequisites to homeownership to help you determine if you’re ready to buy your first home.


A rite of passage 

Buying a house is a significant moment in anyone’s life. It’s often a precursor to starting a career, a family, and settling in a part of the country you will likely call home for a large portion of your life.

It’s also overwhelming.

There’s much to prepare for before buying your first home. You’ll be calculating a lot of expenses, thinking about jobs and schools, and learning new things about home maintenance. Here are some things to think about before buying your first home.


Can I afford it?

The most obvious question first time buyers ask themselves is whether they can afford a home. What many don’t ask, however, is if they can afford all of the unexpected expenses that come with homeownership.

Everyone knows they’ll be making mortgage payments. But to decide if you can really afford a home you’ll have to make a detailed budget. Here are some other expenses to consider:

  • Mortgage closing costs

  • Property tax

  • Home insurance

  • Maintenance and repairs

  • Home improvement

  • All utilities

  • Moving costs


Do I plan on staying in the area?

When you buy a home, you’re not just committing yourself to the house itself, but also to the area you live in. Typically, it only makes sense to buy a home if you’re planning on staying in it for a number of years (usually five or more). Ask yourself the following questions to determine if you can truly commit yourself to your area.

  • Could my career lead me to transferring to another location?

  • Could my spouse’s career lead them to transferring?

  • If children are in the present/future, is the local school district what I’m looking for in terms of education for my child?

  • Will I want to move live to family?

  • Will I have to move soon to care for aging parents?

  • Do I like the weather and culture in the area?


Is my income stable?

Owning a home is much easier when you have a stable income or two stable incomes between you and your significant other. It help you get preapproved for a mortgage and help you rest easy knowing that you can keep up with the bills each month to maintain or build your credit.

Stability doesn’t just mean feeling comfortable that your company won’t get closed down or that you’ll be dismissed from your job. It also means that there are frequent openings in your field of work in the area you choose to live. So, when planning to buy a home, make sure you factor in the potential travel distance to cities or places you could potentially work.


Am I prepared to put in extra work?

If you currently rent an apartment, you’re most likely not responsible for maintenance outside of basic cleaning. Owning a home is a different story. You’ll be taking care of the house inside and out. That means learning basic maintenance and buying the tools for the job.

It also means mowing the lawn, cleaning the gutters, shoveling snow off of the roof, and other menial tasks that you’ll need to make time for.







Deborah Schilling
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